February 21, 2020
Google Chrome to Warn Users about Unsecured Downloads Starting in April

Google will Soon Warn Chrome Users about Unsecured Download Files, Beginning in April before Blocking them Later On

Google is about to make good on its promise to help protect its Chrome browser users from harm on the web by alerting them to unsecured downloads…

Last year, Big G made a promise to its Chrome users to better protect them from unsecured content on the web. Or, downloads that are not encrypted with HTTPS that appear on otherwise secured pages. Now, it’s moving toward making good on its word.

Google Chrome to Warn Users about Unsecured Downloads Starting in April

Google states that with Chrome release 82, which is set to roll out in April, we contain a warning system to alert users before they download certain types of unencrypted files.

The browser will start warning users about .exe files or executable files, as these pose the highest risk. Gradually, Chrome will also start warning users to other sorts of dangers. And, by year’s end, Chrome will ditch the warning messages and outright block unsecured downloads.

Google wrote on its official Chromium Blog, in-part:

“…we’re announcing that Chrome will gradually ensure that secure (HTTPS) pages only download secure files. In a series of steps outlined below, we’ll start blocking ‘mixed content downloads’ (non-HTTPS downloads started on secure pages). This move follows a plan we announced last year to start blocking all insecure subresources on secure pages.

Insecurely-downloaded files are a risk to users’ security and privacy. For instance, insecurely-downloaded programs can be swapped out for malware by attackers, and eavesdroppers can read users’ insecurely-downloaded bank statements. To address these risks, we plan to eventually remove support for insecure downloads in Chrome.”

Ashley Lipman

Ashley Lipman is a super-connector with Outreachmama who helps businesses find their audience online through outreach, partnerships, and networking.

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