Google Expedites its Shut Down of Google+ after a Second Data Leak, will Shutter the Social Property in April 2019 rather than August

The Google Plus shut down now comes earlier, after yet another user data leak is uncovered, bringing an end to the social site in April…

Back in August, the Google+ France page unceremoniously announced it would shut down, as part of the slow Google Plus bust. Just two months later, Google disclosed its struggling social network had suffered a massive data leak and admitted to a cover-up. As a result, the search giant said it would discontinue the Google+ consumer platform in August 2019. Only hours after the news broke, two individuals filed a civil suit against Google in San Francisco.

Google Expedites Google Plus Shut Down by Four Months after Second Data Leak

Now, Google reports suffering another data leak, which impacts as many as 52.5 million users. Vulnerable information includes names, email addresses, occupations, and ages. All of which could have been exposed to developers, even if their accounts were set to private, due to a bug in the Google+ API access. So, the company will move the Google Plus shut down up to April instead of August and cut off access to the API in the next 90 days:

“We’ve recently determined that some users were impacted by a software update introduced in November that contained a bug affecting a Google+ API. We discovered this bug as part of our standard and ongoing testing procedures and fixed it within a week of it being introduced. No third-party compromised our systems, and we have no evidence that the app developers that inadvertently had this access for six days were aware of it or misused it in any way.

With the discovery of this new bug, we have decided to expedite the shut-down of all Google+ APIs; this will occur within the next 90 days. In addition, we have also decided to accelerate the sunsetting of consumer Google+ from August 2019 to April 2019. While we recognize there are implications for developers, we want to ensure the protection of our users.”

Google explains it discovered the bug through a standard test procedure. And, there is “no evidence that the app developers that inadvertently had this access for six days were aware of it or misused.”

The tech corporation states it is already starting to notify users and enterprise customers who were impacted.

Owen E. Richason IV

Covers social media, apps, search and like news. History buff, movie and theme park lover. Blessed dad and husband. Owen is also a musician and is the founder of Groove Modes.