November 25, 2020

The Most Effective Twitter CTA

Most Effective Twitter CTA
Credit: DashBurst.com

Twitter CTA, although just a few syllables and often far fewer than the allowable 140 characters, can be a remarkably effective way to drive traffic to your site. The scenario goes like this: you use some powerful Twitter calls to action, which in turn, gets people on the social network to engage. That produces either traffic to your site, compels users to download something, gets retweeted or mentioned, or rounds up more followers.

Now, that’s harnessing the inherent power of social media. But it also means you’ve got have something to say, something to contribute. If you’re trying to drive traffic to your site, then there better be a carrot dangling, and within reach, off the end of the stick. Follow the rule of thumb to create content for people and not search engines, and that will take care of itself. But there’s the matter of getting people to engage in the first place and these Twitter CTA will do just that.

Why Use Twitter CTA?

The reason for using Twitter Calls to Action is to get traction out of your business’ involvement. Sure, it’s great to feed your presence on the microblog, but at some point, its got to have more to really be a lead or conversion generator. And by employing a reasonable amount of CTAs, that can be accomplished.

Businesses are discovering that Twitter is a very effective tool for marketing, sales, technical support, and customer support. Your prospects and customers are talking about you and your competitors on Twitter, so you need to be listening to what they say and adapting your Twitter strategy to respond to their conversations. You can also use Twitter to proactively promote your brand, generate leads, promote company events and engage with your customers and prospects in real time. —Entrepreneur.com

To put it another way, most users on Twitter, or any other social network for that matter, will not go beyond reading unless they are (politely) asked to do so. Look at it like a video transcript; while its helpful, it won’t build trust.

However, if you nudge your audience just a tiny bit, you’ll see a marked difference over a period of time. And that’s key to understanding how social media really works. Yes, it’s on the internet, and yes, it’s instantaneous, but people tend to take their time, which is okay, because it ought to be organic and natural in flow.

The Top Twitter Calls to Action

Now, onto those Twitter CTA you need to start that campaign of engagement. The microblog conducted a bit of internal research on more than 20,000 Promoted Tweets and came up with the following Twitter calls to action which generated the most results:

  1. Ask users to download something. If you want to see a 13 percent increase in downloads of your e-book or app, then ask for a download in your tweets.  But make the directions clear, give users an incentive, don’t use too many hashtags, and include a deadline.
  2. Ask for a RT or retweet. Give people on the social network an incentive, and then ask for a RT or retweet and you’ll see some serious action unfold. Use the KISS principle and make sure there’s context.
  3. Ask to be followed. When asked to be followed, the study found that responses increased by a whopping 258 percent. But only if you highlight exclusive content and provide an incentive for following.
  4. Ask to get a reply. Outright asking for a reply earned an increase of activity of 334 percent. But, here again, it comes with a few caveats. So, be conversational and personal, and tie a question into something interactive, like a contest.

By using these four Twitter CTA in your social brand building, you’ll get more engagement and that can produce a measurable ROI. So, what about you? How has your business grown its social media presence? Go ahead and tell us all your secrets.

Owen E. Richason IV

Covers social media, apps, search and like news. History buff, movie and theme park lover. Blessed dad and husband. Owen is also a musician and is the founder of Groove Modes.          

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