June 22, 2021
44 State Attorney Generals Request Facebook Abandon Instagram for Kids

Nearly Every State Attorney General wants Facebook to Abandon its ‘Instagram for Kids’ Plans

Almost all state attorney generals have asked Facebook to forgo its plans to launch an Instagram for Kids product, over several concerns…

Practically every state attorney general in the United States thinks it’s a bad idea for Facebook to release a version of Instagram targeted specifically at kids under the age of 13 years old. In fact, out of fifty, forty-four attorneys general believe unleashing such a platform for children under thirteen is a terrible idea. So, they’ve come together to request Facebook abandon its plans to roll out an Instagram for Kids.

44 State Attorney Generals Request Facebook Abandon Instagram for Kids

The forty-four attorneys general cite research which strongly claims social media is unhealthy for kids of this age. Of course, there’s a lot of evidence of this, both anecdotal and empirical. Social media is known to cause emotional, psychological, and even physical harm to children. The National Association of Attorneys General wrote a letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, which in-part states:

“The undersigned attorneys general write regarding Facebook’s recently announced plans to launch a version of Instagram for children under the age of 13. The attorneys general urge Facebook to abandon these plans. Use of social media can be detrimental to the health and well-being of children, who are not equipped to navigate the challenges of having a social media account. Further, Facebook has historically failed to protect the welfare of children on its platforms. The attorneys general have an interest in protecting our youngest citizens, and Facebook’s plans to create a platform where kids under the age of 13 are encouraged to share content online is contrary to that interest.”

Ashley Lipman

Ashley Lipman is a super-connector with Outreachmama who helps businesses find their audience online through outreach, partnerships, and networking.

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