October 27, 2021
Experimental Coronavirus Test uses Voice Screening

There’s an Experimental Coronavirus Test that Uses People’s Voices to Check for Symptoms

Researchers have come up with a new way to test COVID-19 symptoms, through voice analysis, using a smartphone or computer…

As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, there’s increased need for testing COVID-19. Unsurprisingly, with such a new illness, there’s a shortage of test kits available. And, some that are in-use are unreliable. But, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have come up with a novel alternative to traditional means — voice analysis, according to a report by Futurism

Experimental Coronavirus Test uses Voice Screening

The team has developed an experimental coronavirus test system. It’s a web app called the COVID Voice Detector, which uses a proprietary algorithm that attempts to identify signs of infection through the user’s voice.

All that’s needed to try it out is either a smartphone, tablet, or computer with a microphone and an internet connection. Testing is done by asking people to cough a number of times, along with speaking certain vowel sounds, and reciting the alphabet. The app then analyzes the input, giving the user a score that indicates the likelihood of infection.

Anyone interested in giving it a go can visit the site. But, it’s important to note this is not an approved or proven COVID-19 test system. And, it should not be considered a replacement for such or for seeing a licensed physician.

Navigating over to the site triggers a warning, alerting visitors to the fact this is totally an experimental system:

“This is an experimental system which returns a score that indicates a degree of match between your voice signatures and those in the voices of other Covid-19 patients that we have analyzed. The score does not tell you whether you have Covid or not. It is not a medical diagnosis. Please do not take any healthcare related actions based on the scores we return. You could endanger yourself, and the people around you if you do. If you have the slightest reason to believe you may have any kind of health problem, please refer to a healthcare professional immediately.”

William Boleys

Will is an experienced freelance writer who covers a wide range of topics, including apps, social media, and search.

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