November 29, 2020
Firefox default web browser tracking blocker

Firefox is About to Block Web Browsing Trackers by Default

A new Firefox default web browser tracking blocker will hit the market with an upcoming version, improving user experience…

Today, the Mozilla company announced in a blog post its browser will soon automatically block all attempts at cross-site tracking. It will enable the feature by default. Meaning users who don’t mind tracking must manually disable the tool. 

Firefox Default Web Browser Tracking Blocker coming Soon

The new strategy works in three parts. First, it will block all slow-loading trackers, starting with version 63. (Ads are typically the biggest offender, taking more than 5 seconds to load.) Then, when Firefox version 65 hits, the browser will strip all cookies and block all storage access from third-party trackers. Additionally, the company is currently at-work on blocking crypto-mining scripts, as well as trackers which fingerprints users. Regarding the move, Mozilla’s Nick Nguyen explains:

“In the physical world, users wouldn’t expect hundreds of vendors to follow them from store to store, spying on the products they look at or purchase. Users have the same expectations of privacy on the web, and yet in reality, they are tracked wherever they go. Most web browsers fail to help users get the level of privacy they expect and deserve.”

The feature is currently available through the Firefox Nightly release. However, this is an unstable build, so performance is usually buggy. It’s located in the privacy settings dashboard under “Content Blocking.” Once enabled, the browser then walks the user through how it works. It also points out some of the more aggressive privacy settings. And, it warns users turning these on might break some websites.

Owen E. Richason IV

Covers social media, apps, search and like news. History buff, movie and theme park lover. Blessed dad and husband. Owen is also a musician and is the founder of Groove Modes.          

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