September 9, 2021
google-chrome-version-62-marks-http-form-pages-not-secure

Google Chrome to Mark HTTP Pages with Forms, Login Fields, and More, ‘Not Secure’

The search giant is sending an email to websites warning Google Chrome version 62 will mark HTTP pages containing input sections ‘Not Secure’…

Dominant search engine Google is currently sending an email to webmasters warning unencrypted pages with forms, login fields, and other input sections will soon be marked ‘not secure’ starting with the roll out of Chrome version 62.

Google Chrome Version 62 will Mark Unencrypted Pages containing Forms, Login Portals, More, ‘Not Secure’

Google continues its security initiative push as HTTPS pages populate about half the SERP or search engine results page. Last year, the company made clear its strive toward a more secure web.

The company began sending email notifications via the Google Search Console to webmasters which have published encrypted pages containing forms, including login fields, and other types of user inputs last night.

In Google Chrome version 62, which rolls out in October, pages without HTTPS security that include input sections will also be classified as ‘not secure.’ The email reads, in-part, “Beginning in October 2017, Chrome will show the ‘Not secure’ warning in two additional situations: when users enter data on an HTTP page, and on all HTTP pages visited in Incognito mode.”

Below is a screenshot of how various Chrome browsers issue warnings between versions 58 and 62:

form-and-incognito-http-not-secure-warnings
Credit: Google

Here’s how it works when users type data into unsecure HTTP pages:

http-search-warning-not-secure
Credit: Google

Google will also introduce a built-in ad-blocker next year. To comply with its standards, webmasters can use the free self-service tool, “Ad Experience Reports.”

The search engine explains code like <input type=”text”> or <input type=”email”> will trigger the ‘not secure’ warning to users. Google says to prevent the security warning notification, sites need to migrate to HTTPS encryption.

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Owen E. Richason IV

Covers social media, apps, search and like news. History buff, movie and theme park lover. Blessed dad and husband. Owen is also a musician and is the founder of Groove Modes.          

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