January 12, 2021
Internal Document Reveals 19 Smartphones will No Longer be Compatible with T-Mobile in January 2021

These 19 Phones will Stop Working on T-Mobile’s Network Starting January 29th 2021

T-Mobile will soon cease supporting nineteen different smartphones in January 2021, according to an internal company document to employees…

Not everyone is in the habit of upgrading their mobile devices each year or two. In fact, the average time consumers hold onto their phones is increasingly longer. In the US and Europe, the average life-cycle had gone from 22.7 months in 2016 to 24.7 by 2018. In 2020, that amount of time increased to just over 3 years, and is forecast to reach almost four years by the year 2024.

Internal Document Reveals 19 Smartphones will No Longer be Compatible with T-Mobile in January 2021

The trend exists because there’s really not much new with new models. Sure, they tend to offer quicker response, longer-lasting batteries, and a few neat features. But, there’s nothing so enticing consumers must have the latest phones. However, some technology is too old to support, especially at a time when making the switch over to 5G across the globe. As a result, T-Mobile’s network will no longer be compatible with certain handhelds.

The company has already started notifying affected customers by mail and will also send texts on December 28th. Here’s the full list of devices that won’t be able to connect to T-Mobile as of January 29th, 2021:

    • Samsung Galaxy Note 4 (AT&T)
    • Samsung Galaxy Note 4 (Verizon)
    • Samsung Galaxy Note Edge
    • HTC Desire 10 Lifestyle
    • HTC Desire 650
    • Google Nexus 9
    • Huawei Mate 8
    • Huawei P9
    • Mikrotikls SIA_R11e-LTE6
    • Netgear Arlo Security Camera System
    • OnePlus 1
    • Quanta Dragon IR7
    • Samsung Galaxy S5 Duos
    • Sony Xperia Z3 Compact
    • Sony Xperia Z3
    • Sony Xperia Z3 Orion
    • Sony D6616 Xperia Z3 Orion
    • Soyea M02
    • ZTE ZMax

William Boleys

Will is an experienced freelance writer who covers a wide range of topics, including apps, social media, and search.

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