April 10, 2021
Twitterrific

Twitterrific Removes its Push Notifications ahead of Coming Twitter Third-Party App Changes

Twitterrific just depreciated its push notifications and live-updated tweets tools, readying the third-party app for Twitter’s upcoming API changes…

At the beginning of June, Twitter announced it would restrict third-party apps as of August 16th. Now, the impact of that change is starting to take effect. Twitterrific states its removing two of its most popular features: push notifications and live-updating tweets.

Twitterrific Push Notifications and Live-Updated Tweets Nixed

Although, these two options will still work in the meantime, they won’t be around come mid-August. However, the Twitterrific team is making strides to co-exist alongside the coming Twitter API changes. But, it’s recommending its users turn to the actual social microblog rather than to look at its own proprietary tools.

Twitterrific is also deactivating its live-update tweets function and explains it this way:

“Twitter will also be removing the live-streaming service for third-party apps. This means that after the API is shut down, tweets and direct messages will be delayed by a minute or two, instead of displaying in real time.

Starting with today’s update, Twitterrific will still attempt to live stream tweets but will fall back to automatically refreshing your timelines every 2 minutes if it’s unable to connect. Automatic refreshing, unlike streaming, will work even if you are connected via a cellular network.

In most use cases you probably won’t notice the difference, except in cases like live events or with popular searches that update frequently. On the plus side, this change means that Lists can finally auto-refresh themselves like other timelines – something that had been sorely missing for a long time.”

Ultimately, this is likely the reaction Twitter seeks in restricting third-party apps. Meaning, it forces users to find workarounds on its own platform. Albeit, Twitter does notably lack in a few key function areas. Whether it will fill those gaps remains unknown.